PARTIAL AND FULL-THICKNESS BURNS IN THREE DOGS FROM AN ELECTRIOC HEATING PAD


V. BALAZS*, A. LÓPEZ † and B. RIVERA*

*Oftaderm, Clínica especializada en Oftalmología y Dermatología Veterinaria, Santiago, Chile† Centro Vetera-Terapis, Temuco, IX Región, Chile 


Prolonged exposure to electric heating pads in veterinary clinics has been

frequently referred to as a cause of thermal injuries in small animals

CASE 1

Fig. 1

Fig.2

A 1- year- old male German shepherd) was anesthetized for gastrointestinal surgery with a heating pad under the back. On day seven post-surgery, the dog showed a large area of devitalized skin on the dorsal trunk that progressed to welldemarcated serpiginous ulcerations with central necrosis. (Fig.1)

Percentage of body surface compromised was 10-20% with partial thickness lesions.

Treatment was successful with systemic therapy anda topical product made of a combination of honey andessential oils (Centro-Vetera®). (Fig.2)

CASE 2

Fig.3

Fig.4

Fig.5

Fig.6

A 1- year- old female mongrel dog appeared eight days after ovariohysterectomy with demarcated necrotic lesions on the right flank surrounded by erythematous skin. The dog had been kept on lateral recumbency on a heating pad after surgery (Fig.3)

Necrotic skin was resected (Fig.4) and subcutaneous tissue approximated with sutures (Fig.5)

The percentage of body surface compromised was 10% withpartial-thickness lesions.

Healing was achieved using DuoxDERM® Hydroactive® Gel (Fig.6)

CASE 3

Fig.7

A 6-month-old female pomeranian arrived 14 days after an ovariohysterectomy with necrotic lesions on both flanks, dorsum and under the neck.

The dog had been kept on a heating pad for a long time after surgery.

20 - 30% of the body surface was affected by full-thickness injuries and necrotic skin was resected. (Fig.7)

The dog was referred to an intensive care clinic and died due to systemic decompensation.

The use of electric thermal pads in veterinary clinics should be avoided.